How Would the World Look if Humanity Disappeared?

Let’s just assume humanity suddenly disappears off the face of the earth – for whatever reason. YouTube-channel #Mind Warehouse figured out how that would impact our planet. Turns out, it takes about three hundred million years to completely forget we ever wandered around here.

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Helpful Infographic Gives All the Legal Information You Need to Know Before Flying a Drone

There is a lot of information floating around out there regarding the proper “rules” of flying a drone, and they are not only at the Federal level, but also encompass specific rules regarding your state. Because of this, it might feel overwhelming enough to try and just “ignore it,” but that’s not really a good idea… especially if you’re caught and have to face a hefty fine. To help make it easier to understand, the folks at AllDigital made a super-useful infographic that you should really have a look at.

Watch How a TV Crew Sets Up for Mobile Broadcast via This “How It’s Made” Style Video

There are many video professionals, or folks interested in becoming a video professional, who never get a real look at how broadcast television is produced. I personally got very little exposure to this because video production and broadcast media were not my majors in college. Though  several of my friends were majors in those subjects, and I did hear a bit about how television was made, I still can’t say I have a firm grasp on what they actually do. In this “How It’s Made” style video out of Canadian broadcast company Eastlink TV, we can actually get that in-depth look at what teams go through in order to put your favorite sports on your living room television.

Creating the Original Star Wars Lightsaber Effect, In-Camera

In 1977, quality video effects were expensive and time consuming to have, and more often than not a film relied upon in-camera effects and visual trickery to create their movie magic. One of cinema’s most well known space weapons utilized such a trick when it first debuted on film, and Shanks FX recreated this process in a really fun behind-the-scenes tutorial.

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Adobe Video World Offers the “Small Classroom” Teaching Style Missing at Other Conventions

A couple weeks ago I attended the first iteration of Adobe Video World, a combination of Adobe Premiere World and Adobe After Effects World, and a one week powerhouse of learning based in San Jose, CA. I’m not normally one for big teaching events like I thought this would be, but it turned out Adobe Video World was exactly what I look for in education: small, more personal and easier access to instructors who were teaching techniques I was genuinely interested in.

I have attended classes/workshops/lectures at Photo Plus, WPPI, NAB, CES and Adobe MAX, and my main issue with all of them is that because of the huge volume of people at the events, either classes are absolutely packed auditoriums and/or the subject matter was far too high level so as to appeal to a larger group of people. I never left any of the lectures feeling smarter or better about a particular skill set, and that left me instead with a feeling of regret and wasted time. Sure, there are exceptions, but for the most part I personally don’t learn well from these giant lecture halls. I think it might come from my education growing up, where my high school and college both prided themselves on small classroom sizes and direct connection with instructors.

That is exactly what Adobe Video World still is, and in my opinion, it makes it the best place to go and actually learn something.

In-Depth Tutorial on Shooting Motion Star Timelapses

Star timelapses, or starlapses for short, are both visually impressive and difficult to pull off without a little direction. In this video from the guys at Syrp, Mark Gee explains how he sets up for his star timelapses.

The 180 Degree Shutter Rule: What It Is & Why You Should Follow It

Because so many modern video enthusiasts and filmmakers are self taught, it’s not uncommon to run across a few that don’t know what the 180 degree shutter rule is, or why they should even care about it. So what is it? The rule states that your shutter speed needs to be one over two times your frame rate. In this video by Stronz Vanderploeg, he explains a lot about the rule and give you visual evidence as to why he endorses it. “When it comes to video cameras, there are 3 ways to control exposure internally on the camera: ISO, Aperture, and Shutter Speed/Angle. ISO affects noise performance, Aperture controls depth of field and Shutter Speed determines motion blur. All too often I see videos shot at different shutter speeds with varying amount of motion blur but is there really such a thing as ‘the right way to do it?'”